The Firehouse Lawyer Newsletter

Results for newsletters with the topic “Fair Labor Standards Act” and the subtopic “207 (k) Exemption

DescriptionVolume_IssueYearMonthPDF
The Firehouse Lawyer loves talking about the Fair Labor Standards Act, and today we discuss the U.S. Supreme Court declining to decide a case involving whether a paramedic was 207 (k)-exempt from the overtime rules; we also discuss "red flags" for identity theft and developing policies for responding to claims. 09-0420094v09n04apr2009.pdf
Today we discuss various claims brought under the Washington Law Against Discrimination, and we inquire into whether paramedics may be exempt under Section 207 (k) of the Fair Labor Standards Act. 09-0220092v09n02feb2009.pdf
This issue discusses a Washington Supreme Court case which extends the common law tort for wrongful discharge in violation of public policy to all employees, including union employees with protections within collective bargaining agreements; we also discuss amendments to the 207 (k) exemption under FLSA, which provides a partial overtime exemption for emergency workers such as police and firefighters. 04-0120001v04n01jan2000.pdf
Today the Firehouse Lawyer considers some important case law interpreting the importance of response times and reasonable estimates for disclosing records under the Public Records Act; legislative clarification of the 207 (k) exemption under FLSA; another important case involving civil services commissions as they relate to collective bargaining; we also look at scoring criteria for veterans; and then we address certain questionable NFPA standards that may increase litigation. 03-12199912v03n12dec1999.pdf
Today the Firehouse Lawyer revisits various provisions of the FLSA, including the 207 (k) exemption; we then address some FMLA cases of importance; some definitional changes in RCW 296-305; and a question regarding bona fide occupational qualifications under the ADA. 03-0219992v03n02feb1999.pdf
We now address some “burning” constitutional questions surrounding burning permits; some updates to the FLSA 207 (k) exemption; and finally, a question regarding the handwriting of multiple individuals on reports. 03-0119991v03n01jan1999.pdf
The 207 (k) exemption under FLSA, which exempts employees engaged in fire protection activities from the overtime laws, is controversial, and we discuss a huge 207 (k) case here; we then note that the US Supreme Court declined to hear another 207 (k) case where some firefighter/paramedics were deemed qualified for the 207(k)exemption even though they spent more than 20% of their time on unrelated activities that were not strictly firefighting; and a US Supreme Court case voiding an ADEA release; also, we address another case involving same-sex harassment; the concept of "medical necessity” under the FMLA; the disability leave supplement and promotional examinations; and to conclude, we consider an issue with mergers. 02-0419984v02n04apr1998.pdf
Most importantly, today we consider what FLSA DOES NOT require; we then analyze whether indefinite leave may be a “reasonable accommodation” under the ADA; mere obesity can be considered a disability under the ADA; and whether paramedics and firefighters are 207 (k)-exempt under FLSA. 01-0319976v01n03jun1997.pdf
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